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Teaching

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BIOL 606/680 - How to Write a Grant Proposal

This course takes you through the steps of writing a standard federal grant proposal. By the end of the course you will have written a proposal and served as a panelist for review of the class proposals. In addition, many faculty participate in the sessions to share their experience and insight.

Typical comments about the course:

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BIOL 604/680 - Survival Kit for Scientists: Teaching Issues

This course focuses on teaching undergraduates. It provides an introduction into the science education literature and lots of practical techniques. Faculty participate in panel discussions on key educational issues, such as cooperative learning, teaching scientific writing, and developing hands-on laboratories. The graduate students develop a Teaching Portfolio, which helps complete the requirements of the University's Certificate in College Teaching.

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Comments by past students:

Whether you are applying for a position as an assistant professor or developing your first Teaching Portfolio, you will have to write your "teaching philosophy". An effective description of your teaching philosophy will be unique to you, in that it reveals the essence of you as a teacher. One more piece of advice: limit it to one single-spaced page.

Examples: 1 2 3

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WEB LINKS

BIOL 680 - Survival Kit for Scientists: Research Issues

This is a very fun course - what we do will largely depend on the interests of the class. The idea is to explore research issues in a broad context and develop a personal research strategy.

The topics include: "the scientific method", developing research projects for your undergraduate students, developing a research strategy for graduate work/postdoctoral position/first job, postdoctoral strategy - getting a postdoctoral position and using it as a stepping stone, getting the first job, how to present a seminar, how to make a poster for a scientific meeting, lab management, developing a web page to advertise your research, politics of funding. Each week one or two students are in charge of a topic and organizing how we will investigate that topic, which can include inviting faculty members to participate. Grades are based on class participation, topic presentation and overview project.

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Last Updated: 12/26/13