Skip header content and main navigation Binghamton University, State University of New York - Economics
 

Working papers, 2002

0201
Subal Kumbhakar and Subrata Sarkar
Deregulation, Ownership, and Productivity Growth in the Banking Industry: Evidence from India

0202
Sol Polachek
Trade-Based Interactions: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

0203
Leo Turcotte, John Robst, and Sol Polachek
Does Type of Health Insurance Matter?

0204
Florenz Plassmann and John Lott
More Readers of Gun Magazines, But Not More Crimes

0205
John Robst, Jennifer VanGilder, and Sol Polachek
Perceptions of female faculty treatment in higher education: which institutions treat women more fairly?

0206
Florenz Plassmann
The Advantage of Avoiding the Armington Assumption in Multi-Regional Models

0207
Neha Khanna
Is Air Quality Income Elastic? Revisiting the Environmental Kuznets Curve Hypothesis

0208
Kenneth Greene and Phillip Nelson
The Market for Status

0209
Sol Polachek
Mincer's Overtaking Point and the Lifecycle Earnings Distribution

0210
Florenz Plassmann and Nic Tideman
Frank H. Knight's Suggestion to Combine Land, Labor, and Capital into a Single Factor of Production, and His Objection Against the "Single Tax"/p>

0211
Ken Greene and Bong Yoon
N/A

0212
Sol Polachek
N/A

0213
Florenz Plassmann and Neha Khanna
Assessing the Precision of Turning Point Estimates in Polynomial Regression Functions


Number: 0201

Authors: Subal Kumbhakar and Subrata Sarkar

Title: Deregulation, Ownership, and Productivity Growth in the Banking Industry: Evidence from India

Abstract:

This paper analyzes the relationship between deregulation and total factor productivity (TFP) growth in the Indian banking industry using a generalized shadow cost function approach. TFP growth is decomposed into a technological change, a scale, and a miscellaneous component. A disaggregated panel data analysis, using the population of public and private banks over 1985-1996 that covers both pre- and post-deregulation periods, indicates that a significant decline in regulatory distortions and the anticipated increase in TFP growth have not yet materialized following deregulation. While private sector banks have improved their performance mainly due to the freedom to expand output, public sector banks have not responded well to the deregulation measures.

File: Working Paper 0201


Number: 0202

Authors: Sol Polachek

Title: Trade-Based Interactions: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

Abstract:

No abstract. The paper contains the Presidential Address, Peace Science Society, presented at Yale University, October 28, 2000.

File: Working paper 0202


Number: 0203

Authors: Leo Turcotte, John Robst, Sol Polacheck

Title: Does Type of Health Insurance Matter?

Abstract:

No abstract.

File: Working Paper 0203


Number: 0204

Authors: Florenz Plassmann, John Lott

Title: More Readers of Gun Magazines, But Not More Crimes

Abstract:

The paper describes an analysis of the relationship between changes in the number of guns and changes in the number of crimes. Both variables are non-negative integers with large mass points at zero, and both variables are likely to affect each other. We account for these characteristics by analyzing our data with a multivariate Poisson-lognormal model that we estimate with the Gibbs sampler. Because county-level data on gun ownership are not available, we use data on subscriptions to the gun magazine Handguns Magazine as a proxy. We do not find any evidence of a pattern that would suggest that either more guns lead to more crimes or that more crimes lead to more guns.

File:Working paper 0204


Number: 0205

Authors: John Robst, Jennifer VanGilder, Sol Polachek

Title: Perceptions of female faculty treatment in higher education: which institutions treat women more fairly?

Abstract:

This paper analyzes a national sample of postsecondary faculty first to determine whether treatment of female faculty is perceived as fair and second to examine what institutional characteristics are related to fair treatment. The results indicate that the majority of male and female faculty believe female faculty are treated fairly. However, perceived treatment varies with a number of institutional and faculty characteristics.

File: Working Paper 0205


Number: 0206

Authors: Florenz Plassmann

Title: The Advantage of Avoiding the Armington Assumption in Multi-Regional Models

Abstract:

Virtually all existing multi-regional computable general equilibrium models employ the assumption that goods that are produced in different regions are imperfect substitutes for each other. The paper argues that this assumption is not only undesirable for models on the state, county, or municipality, but that it unnecessarily prolongs the time to solve the model. The paper describes an alternative algorithm that permits the construction of multi-regional models with many regions and many factors of production with limited mobility.

File: Working paper 0206


Number: 0207

Authors: Neha Khanna

Title: Is Air Quality Income Elastic? Revisiting the Environmental Kuznets Curve Hypothesis

Abstract:

It is generally assumed that the Environmental Kuznets Curve relationship between pollution and income is due to the combined effects of economic scale, composition, technical change, trade policy, and consumer demand for environmental quality. The aim of this paper is to isolate the empirical magnitude of the last factor. The pollution-income relationship is estimated while controlling for the influence of the other factors, and socio-economic factors such as race, education, housing, and propensity for collective action. The analysis is based on 1990 ambient concentrations of five air pollutants and data for U.S. census tracts. An inverted U-shaped curve is obtained in the case of PM10. For NOx the curve is U-shaped. For the remaining gases the relationship between ambient concentrations and median household income is statistically insignificant. Consequently, while the income elasticity of pollution is negative and monotonically declining for PM10, it is positive and rising in the case of NOx. Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that these results may also hold for other point source and non-point source pollutants, respectively. These results question the long-term global applicability of the Environmental Kuznets Curve.

File: Working Paper 0207


Number: 0208

Authors: Kenneth Greene and Phillip Nelson

Title: The Market for Status

Abstract:

No abstract.

File: Working paper 0208


Number: 0209

Authors: Sol Polachek

Title: Mincer's Overtaking Point and the Lifecycle Earnings Distribution

Abstract:

No abstract.

File: Working Paper 0209


Number: 0210

Authors: Florenz Plassmann and Nic Tideman

Title: Frank H. Knight's Suggestion to Combine Land, Labor, and Capital into a Single Factor of Production, and His Objection Against the "Single Tax"

Abstract:

Frank Hyneman Knight opposed Henry George's proposal to implement a Single tax on land value. Knight argued that it would be appropriate to combine land, labor, and capital into a single factor of production, and that pure land value, as envisaged by the advocates of the Single Tax, does not exist. We examine Knight's claim and place the Single Tax within Knight's own framework of property rights. We argue that Knight ignored an inefficiency that stems from the original appropriation of land if the market is used to assign property rights in land. The inefficiency is visible only if land and capital are conceptually separated.

File: Working Paper 0210


Number: 0211

Authors: Subal Kumbhakar and Efthymios G. Tsionas

Title: N/A

Abstract:

No abstract.

File: Not available online.


Number: 0212

Authors: Sol Polachek

Title: N/A

Abstract:

No abstract.

File: Not available online.


Number: 0213

Authors: Florenz Plassmann and Neha Khanna

Title: Assessing the Precision of Turning Point Estimates in Polynomial Regression Functions

Abstract:

We discuss three methods to assess the precision of turning point estimates in polynomial regression models. The first method is the generally used "Delta method," which uses a normal approximation of the distribution of the turning point estimator. The second method uses the exact distribution of the turning point estimator of quadratic regression functions, and requires only an estimate of the covariance of the coefficient estimators in addition to the usual estimates of the means and variances. The third method relies on Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to provide a finite sample approximation of the exact distribution of the turning point estimator, and can be used to assess the precision of turning point estimates in models with higher order polynomials. We argue that the Delta method may lead to misleading inference and that the other two methods are more reliable. We compare the three methods using two data sets from the Environmental Kuznets Curve literature.

File:Working paper 0213


Connect with Binghamton:
Twitter icon links to Binghamton University's Twitter page YouTube icon links to Binghamton University's YouTube page Facebook icon links to Binghamton University's Facebook page Instagram

Last Updated: 6/16/09