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Miners and the State in the Ottoman Empire: the Zonguldak Coalfield

Miners and the State in the Ottoman Empire: the Zonguldak Coalfield

The Ottoman Empire 1700-1922

The Ottoman Empire 1700-1922

International Labor and Working Class History

International Labor and Working Class History

 Turkish Studies in the United States

Turkish Studies in the United States

Consumption Studies & The History Of The Ottoman Empire

Consumption Studies & The History Of The Ottoman Empire

An economic and social history of the late Ottoman period, c. 1700-1922

An economic and social history of the late Ottoman period, c. 1700-1922

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Title of the book

Ottoman Manufacturing in the Age of the Industrial Revolution

Ottoman Manufacturing in the Age of the Industrial Revolution

 
Donald Quataert

Donald Quataert

State University of New York Distinguished Professor
http://harvey.binghamton.edu/~ottmiddl/
http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~coal/index.htm
http://www.history-compass.com/viewpoint.asp?section=8&ref=28


We are saddened to report the recent passing of our distinguished and beloved colleague, Don Quataert. A celebration of his life and contributions was on Saturday, April 2 at in the Anderson Center Chamber Hall on the Binghamton University Campus. You can watch the program in its entirety below.

Celebrating the Life of Donald Quataert: Part 1

Celebrating the Life of Donald Quataert: Part 2

Celebrating the Life of Donald Quataert: Part 3


I am a Middle East, Ottoman, historian interested in labor, social and economic history during the period 1750-1923. At the undergraduate level, I offer survey courses of Middle East history during the early modern and modern periods. In addition, I am active in the global history program of the department and, together with Jean Quataert, regularly team-teach an undergraduate course on Modern World History. At the graduate level I offer seminars and also work individually with students on their own areas of research interest. As needed, I provide training in the reading of Ottoman archival sources. I am also deeply committed to comparative and global history and offer training to students in all fields of study--e.g., U.S., Europe, Latin America--in the belief they will profit pedagogically and when entering the job market.

I welcome applications from students interested in all areas of Ottoman history. Throughout my career, I have sought to understand Ottoman history from below by examining the lives of Ottoman peasants and workers. This has been an exciting and challenging task, in part because our main sources of information are the records provided by the Ottoman state itself. Such records, naturally, give priority attention to issues around stability and the flow of tax revenues and not the lives and concerns of Ottoman subjects. That is, my main task has been to extract from the Ottoman documents stories they were not intended to reveal.

I have carried out extensive research on the economic and social history of the late Ottoman period, c. 1700-1922. The research has been based, first of all, on the Ottoman sources in the archives located in Istanbul as well as libraries there and in Ankara. I also have made quite considerable use of archives in Germany, Austria, France, England, and the United States.

My research interests first focused on agrarian change, a truly formidable and challenging subject, that still awaits a more thorough analysis by historians. I then turned to an investigation of changing transportation and communication systems and their impact on the economy, especially during the 19th century. More recently, labor history-a truly unexplored area of Ottoman studies-has been the main subject of my concern. Important issues here include the role of guild organizations in the work force; the importance of women as workers; the lives of labor; the role of the Janissaries in Ottoman guilds; and a reconstruction of the everyday lives of workers. I am preparing a history of the late Ottoman Empire based on the "corruption" case of an official in the Zonguldak coal field on the Black Sea coast of Ottoman Anatolia. This involves miners and their families, guilds, shopkeepers, mine operators, imams and state officials, c. 1900. It forms part of the larger project on the coal miners, c. 1820-1920.

Students interested in applying for graduate studies in Ottoman history should refer to the Graduate Programs. There you will find information on the application procedures and on the teaching assistantships that are available to qualified students.


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Last Updated: 6/21/11