Binghamton University film series resumes with lineup of nine movies

2002-09-10

The Harpur Film Society of Binghamton University will screen nine international films this semester including the popular cult film Amélie.

The films, which are shown at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Sundays in Lecture Hall 6 on the University campus, include offerings from Europe, Asia, the Mideast and South America. Films are shown in their original language with English subtitles.

Single tickets are $3 at the door. Membership to the film society, which entitles admittance to all film screenings, is $18 for the general public or $15 for students and seniors.

The schedule is as follows:

• September 20 and 22, Nine Queens, a 2000 Argentinian film, directed by Fabian Bielinsky. A polished caper film about a small-time crook who gets recruited by a big-time thief to swindle some swindlers out of a collection of rare stamps.

• September 27 and 29, Amélie, a 2001 French film, directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Amélie is a shy waitress whose mission in life is to spread joy and goodness among the folk she encounters in her day-to-day existence. Audrey Tatou stars in this effervescent, quirky fairy tale that is at once sweet and acerbic. This screening is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the French Ministry of Culture (CNC).

• October 4 and 6, Ratcatcher, a 2000 Scottish film, directed by Lynne Ramsay. The film revolves around James, a mischievous boy living in a Glasgow slum, and more than a study of social realism, explores the power of imagination through a blend of squalor and beauty.

• October 11 and 13, Chunhyang, a 2000 Korean film, directed by Im Kwon Taek. Based on one of Korea’s most famous folk tales, Chunhyang is a story of romantic passion, told with chanted narration by a traditional storyteller.

• October 18 and 20, The Inheritors, a 1998 Austrian film, directed by Stefan Ruzowitsky. A tale of class warfare set in the early 1930s in rural Austria, Ruzowitsky fashions a sharply satirical portrait of the caste system in operation.

• October 25 and 27, Happenstance, a 2000 French film, directed by Laurent Firode. The film explores the theory of interrelated coincidence acted out by unrelated characters as they bounce off one another, their smallest acts influencing the lives of people they have never met. This screening is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the French Ministry of Culture (CNC).

• November 1 and 3, A Time for Drunken Horses, a 2000 film from Iran, directed by Bahman Ghobadi. Directed by Iran’s first Kurdish filmmaker, the film offers a harrowing picture of the condition of the Kurds in the aftermath of the Iran-Iraq war. The story focuses on a family of five orphaned children and their struggle to survive.

• November 8 and 10, The Closet, a 2001 French film, directed by Francis Veber. A comedy that raises serious issues about social identity and contemporary hypocrisy. The film stars Daniel Auteuil and Gérard Depardieu. This screening is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the French Ministry of Culture (CNC).

• November 15 and 17, The Way we Laughed, a 1998 Italian film, directed by Gianni Amelio. Amelio tells the story of two Sicilian brothers by dealing with a single day each year between 1958 and 1964 and the evolution from year to year of the brothers’ relationship with each other.

For more information about the film series and the Harpur Film Society, call 607-777- 2168. Subscriptions may be purchased by mail or in person at Binghamton University’s English Department Office, located in Bartle Library North, room LN-1149.

Last Updated: 9/17/13