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In the News

January-March 2007

J. David Hacker, assistant professor of history, was featured in the January 6 issue of Women’s Health Law Weekly for his study on declining U.S. fertility rates. The total fertility rate, which is the number of children a woman has in her lifetime, fell from seven or eight in 1800 to slightly more than two today. Hacker was awarded a five-year $667,237 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to aid his research. The February 15 issue of LiveScience in New York City and the March 5 issue of Health & Medicine Week also ran the story.

David Sloan Wilson, professor of biological sciences, was mentioned in The New York Times January 7 article “Why Our Hero Leapt onto the Tracks and We Might Not.” The article, which discussed Wesley Autrey’s heroic rescue of stranger Cameron Hollopeter in a Manhattan subway station, claims that Mr. Autrey’s reaction to the situation is unlike many of ours. Wilson said Mr. Autrey exhibited an extraordinarily high degree of “other-oriented” behavior. “He’s a rarity,” Wilson states.

Joseph T. McCann, adjunct assistant professor of psychology, was featured in January 6 issue of The Post Standard for his book “Terrorism on American Soil.” McCann discussed the history of terrorism and how it has been a reoccurring event in our nation’s history as far back as the assassination of Abraham Lincoln in 1865. McCann believes that the better we understand terrorism and its history, the more tools we will have to conquer it.

J. David Hacker, assistant professor of history, was noted in the January 8 issue of the Wilmington Morning Star in an article about popular baby names in America. Hacker has studied U.S. first names from the Colonial era through 1920. “There was a revolution in naming patterns in the Colonial period especially in Puritan New England which very consciously turned to the Bible as a source of forenames,” Hacker explained.

Binghamton University was recognized for being ranked as the top SUNY school in the rankings for the best values among public colleges for out of state students by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. Binghamton University was ranked #5 for in state students in public universities. These rankings were reported in their February issue. Schools were ranked on academic quality, cost and financial aid. Fox News 12 in Oregon, Wisconsin State Journal, Star-Gazette, Democrat & Chronicle, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Triangle Business Journal, Washington Business Journal, Bizjournals.com, San Antonio Journal, Phoenix Business Journal, Milwaukee Business Journal, Palladium Times, The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) and Charlotte Business Journal also covered the story.

Hao Wang, of Binghamton University’s Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center of Excellence, was noted in US States News’ January 10 issue as part of the faculty who will aid the State University of New York in their upcoming new initiative called the Empire Innovation Program. This program, which will be fully implemented over the next two years, will add 200 new research faculty who are extraordinarily promising researchers. Wang, who has a company established at the Binghamton University Incubator, is a recruited member of the program.

Lois Einhorn, professor of English, was featured in a January 10 article titled “Child Abuse and Forgiveness: Celebrity Responses Cause Controversy” from the eMediaWire newswire. Einhorn’s book “Forgiveness and Childhood Abuse: Would YOU Forgive?” focuses on her childhood physical and sexual abuse. In the recent article, Einhorn posed a question about forgiveness of her situation to 53 celebrities, authors, politicians, death row inmates, clergymen, therapists and others and discussed their answers.

President Lois B. DeFleur was noted in the January 10 issues of Newsday and The Post Standard for her attendance at the Upstate Medical University’s March symposium about women in science and academia. President DeFleur joined former U.S. secretary of health and human services, Donna Shalala, as well as many other local college and university presidents. WSTM TV of Central New York, News 10 Now and WCAX TV of Vermont also covered the story.

Linda P. Spear, distinguished professor of psychology, was featured in the January 12 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education in an article called “Who’s Minding the Teenage Brain?” The article discussed the need to study adolescence to try to understand what makes it such a vulnerable stage of life for reckless behavior. On studying the adolescent brain, Spear said, “It’s really incredible that there isn’t a long history of doing this work. It just blows my mind because it’s so critical.” Spear studies adolescence in rats at the University.

Liz Rosenberg, professor of English and creative writing, reviewed four books for a January 14 article of The Boston Globe. In her article, Lives of ingenuity and courage, Rosenberg critiqued the following books: Marvelous Mattie: How Margaret E. Knight Became an Inventor by Emily Arnold McCully; Su Dongpo: Chinese Genius by Demi; John Lewis in the Lead: A Story of the Civil Rights Movement by Jim Haskins and Kathleen Benson; and Genius: A Photobiography of Albert Einstein by Marfe Ferguson Delano. Rosenberg newest books include “Nobody’s Home”, a children’s picture book, and “Demon Love” for adults.

Albrecht Inhoff, professor of psychology, was recognized by Mental Health Weekly Digest January 15 for his study “Temporal overlap in the linguistic processing of successive words in reading: reply to Pollatsek,, Reichle, and Rayner.” It was published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology.

The Nigerian Tribune featured Nkiru Nzegwu, chair of the department of African studies, in its January 16 issue. The issue discussed Nzegwu’s article “Iyoba Idia: Mother of the Nation, the Hidden Oba of Benin” and the victory of the ancient Benin over Idah, which enabled the kingdom to gain and consolidate its imperial advantage in the north-south of the Niger river trade route.

William Dunn, assistant chief of the New York State University Police at Binghamton, was quoted in a January 17 Newhouse News Service article about college student identity theft. In it, Dunn said, “We tell students not to respond to e-mail messages concerning bank credit cards or bank accounts. Don’t use numbers of Web sites sent via an e-mail message.” The article discusses ways for students to avoid credit card scams and computer system hackers.

Ali A. Mazrui, professor of political science, was recognized in the New Jersey Record on January 17 for working alongside Amadu Jacky Kaba, assistant professor of public and healthcare administration in the graduate department of Seton Hall.

Howard G. Brown, professor of history, was featured in a January 19 Forbes article about Napoleon Bonaparte’s possible cause of death. He said, “If Napoleon had lived, he could have conceivably returned to power in France during a crisis in 1830.” It was widely believed that Napoleon was murdered and poisoned, which prevented his return to power. “There’s little doubt that he would have pursued French expansion once again,” Brown said. “It was in his blood, and it had always been his biggest source of legitimacy.” Brown believes that if Napoleon had returned to power, the modern world would be changed. “Had France captured and hung on to the Middle East until the oil age, it would have been more important to them than India was to Britain. Furthermore, with Middle East oil, France would have dominated the first half of the 20th century at least.” Brown was also featured in HealthDay Reporter and Health24 South Africa.

In The New York Times article about magic and nonsensical rituals on January 23, professor of psychology, Mark Lenzenweger, was quoted. He said, “Those whose magical thoughts can blossom into full-blown delusion ad psychosis appear to be a fundamentally different group in their own right. These are people for whom magical thinking is a central part of how they view the world, not a vague sense of having special powers. Whereas with most people, if you were to confront them about their magical beliefs, they would back down.” Lenzenweger was also noted in Alabama’s The Tuscaloosa News and The International Herald Tribune.

Ricardo Rene Laremont, professor of political science and sociology, wrote an article titled “America in Africa: addressing a mix of Islam and Oil” for The Daily Star Lebanon on January 23. In his story, Laremont discusses how American investments in education and healthcare overseas are under-funded by the Bush administration, in comparison to military investments.

Binghamton University was named on January 26 on WCAX-TV in Vermont and WSTM-TV in New York for its thriving dual-diploma program with Turkey. The program was selected as one of the winners of the sixth annual Andrew Heiskell Awards for Innovation in International Education. Oktay Sekercisoy, associate director of dual-diploma programs, said, “The program gives two different perspectives to students, and in this global world, having more perspective is really important. Sekercisoy was also quoted in Associated Press, Newsday, The Buffalo News and amNew York.

Marilyn Tallerico, professor in the Graduate School of Education, was awarded the Staff Development Book of the Year Award by the National Staff Development Council. Tallerico’s award was mentioned in the January 30 edition of News On Women. Her book is called “Supporting and Sustaining Teacher’s Professional Development: A Principal’s Guide.”

Binghamton University was featured in USINFO, issued by the U.S. State Department, on February 1 for its dual-diploma program in cooperation with Turkey. The program has grown from 33 students in 2003 to more than 1,500 students in 24 programs in 2006. Nine Turkish and 10 SUNY campuses are participating. The University’s program was also featured in Rochester’s The Chronicle, The Poughkeepsie Journal, University Business Daily (Connecticut) and The Observer Dispatch of Utica. According to the February 11 edition of The Poughkeepsie Journal, there are 153 Turkish students at Binghamton University, 27 of which will complete their degrees in May.

Donald Quataert, professor of history, was quoted in The Ithaca Journal on February 7 for his commentary on the dual-degree program with Turkey. Quataert, an Ottoman Empire scholar, said, “The Turkey programs are a bridge to the Muslim world. Turkey is a society many Americans have little knowledge of.”

J. David Hacker, assistant professor of history and vice chair for graduate studies, was quoted in Pennsylvania’s The Reading Eagle on February 2. In an article about naming patterns of parents, Hacker said, “There was a revolution in naming patterns in the Colonial period, especially Puritan New England, which very consciously turned to the Bible as a source of forenames.” Hacker studied U.S. first names from the Colonial era through 1920.

William Dunn, assistant chief of the Binghamton University police, was quoted in a February 2 The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA) article about college student identity theft. Dunn said, “We tell students not to respond to e-mail messages concerning bank credit cards or bank accounts. Don’t use numbers of Web sites sent via an e-mail message.” Dunn was also featured in Syracuse’s The Post-Standard on February 5 on the same topic.

Newhouse News Service quoted Andy Morris, associate director of undergraduate admissions, on February 6, in an article about choosing the right college. “Students should choose the school where they will succeed, not where the basketball or football team succeeds,” Morris said. “They should choose a school where they feel a sense of belonging, not where half their high school is planning on attending.” Morris came up with a list of questions when deciding on a college that included, “What’s the school’s retention rate?; Does it have the basic creature comforts to make me happy—good dorms, social life, technology, food and friends?; What is the four-year graduation rate?; Will this school get me where I want to go?’ The March 4 issue of The Times-Picayune in New Orleans, LA also ran the story.

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance rated Binghamton University among the top 100 public schools that combine outstanding value with a first-class education. KRON 4 Bay Area in San Francisco and KVOA in Tucson, Arizona recognized this honor on February 6.

The San Antonio Express News in Texas quoted David Sloan Wilson, professor of biology and evolution, in a February 6 article about altruism. He said, “There’s a kind of bell curve of altruism, with most individuals in the middle and a few individuals on each end. For every psychopath who does unspeakably evil things, there’s a hero who does unspeakably noble things.”

Jian Wang, professor of physics, was featured on WETM-TV Channel 18 in Elmira, for an experiment he conducted on the dangers that household appliances and furniture can pose to children. Wang demonstrated how common pieces of furniture, including bedroom dressers, tip over easily when the drawers are pulled out.

Howard G. Brown, professor of history, was featured in Colorado’s The Daily Sentinel on February 8, in an article about Napoleon Bonaparte’s possible cause of death. Brown said, “If Napoleon had lived, he could have conceivably returned to power in France during a crisis in 1830.” It was widely believed that Napoleon was poisoned, preventing his return to power. “There’s little doubt that he would have pursued French expansion once again,” Brown said. “It was in his blood, and it had always been his biggest source of legitimacy.”

Binghamton University was named in The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education on February 8 for having a high percentage of graduating black students. At 72 percent, Binghamton University was among top universities, including University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of California at Berkeley.

Patrick Madden, associate professor of computer science, was featured in EETimes of San Francisco on February 8, in a feature about the International Symposium on Physical Design’s IC routing content. Madden was named the ISPD 2007 general chair for the event. “In the past two of three years, routing has gotten to be a hot topic, and there are a ton of startups in this area,” Madden said. “In the hopes of nailing down what works and what doesn’t, we’ll be doing a global routing contest this year.”

Researchers from Binghamton University published their findings on schizophrenic and schizotypic psychopathology in the February 12 issue of Health and Medicine Week. Mark Lenzenweger, professor of psychology, and colleagues also published their studies on eye movement and schizotypy in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Health Risk Factor Week, African News Dimension (South Africa), Psych Central News (Mass.), PressZoom (Netherlands), Innovations Report (Germany), EarthTimes.org, United Press International, Science Daily (Maryland), FirstScience (United Kingdom), Doctor’s Guide News, South Asian Women’s Forum, HULIQ.com (North Carolina), ANI, Washington, DC, via Yahoo!, News-Medical (Australia), India News Channel, NewKerala.com, MedIndia.com, MediLexicon (Mexico), Medical News Today (UK) and Disease Prevention Week.

Researchers from Binghamton University published their findings on neurobiology in the February 12 edition of Health and Medicine Week. J.J. Roland, a psychology graduate student, and colleagues published their study in Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

S. Sharma, professor of chemistry, and fellow researchers at Binghamton University published their findings in biochemistry in Pharma Business Week, Pharma Law Weekly, Drug Law Weekly, Pharma Investments, Ventures and Law Weekly, Health and Medicine Week, Biotech Business Week and Analytical Biochemistry on February 12.

S.L. Boehm, assistant professor of psychology, was featured in the February 13 issue of Medical Imaging Law Weekly for his recent neurology research on mice and GABA(A) receptors. The March 5 issues of Biotech Business Week and Pharma Law Weekly published this story as well.

The University of Buffalo News Center featured Norman E. Spear, distinguished professor of psychology, in a February 21 issue about research on alcoholism. Spear, also the director of the Center for Development Psychobiology and clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Clinical Campus of Upstate Medical Center, presented his study to a seminar at the University of Buffalo. It was titled, “Roots of Alcoholism: Very Early Exposure to Ethanol?”

Shalini Shankar, assistant professor of anthropology and Asian American studies, was quoted in the New Brunswick Home News Tribune on February 25 in an article about ethnic name calling, particularly geared toward Desis. Shankar is working on a book about slang among Desi teens living in Silicon Valley, California. She said the acronym ABCD, ‘American-Born Confused Desi’ is “practically out of use.”

United Press International, in its February 26 article about autism, named Binghamton University for its help with research on the topic. Researchers at the University observed in minute detail where, how and how long an autistic child casts a glance in the presence of faces, objects and actions, either live or on video.

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Last Updated: 12/19/11